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07-16-2019 City Council Strategic Planning MeetingL 11 0 A CITY OF MONROE CITY COUNCIL STRATEGIC PLANNING MEETING 300 WEST CROWELL STREET MONROE, NORTH CAROLINA 28112 JULY 16, 2019 — 4:00 P.M. AGENDA www.monroenc.org 1. Belk Tonawanda Park Master Plan — Phase I -A 2. Energy Services Capital Project Update/Overview City Council Strategic Planning Meeting July 16, 2019 Page 267 CITY OF MONROE CITY COUNCIL STRATEGIC PLANNING MEETING JULY 16, 2019 MINUTES The City Council of the City of Monroe, North Carolina, met in a Strategic Planning Meeting in the Council Chambers located at 300 West Crowell Street in Monroe, North Carolina at 4:00 p.m. on July 16, 2019 with Mayor Bobby Kilgore presiding. Present: Mayor Bobby Kilgore, Mayor Pro Tem Gary Anderson, Council Member Surluta Anthony, Council Member Marion Holloway, Council Member Lynn Keziah, Council Member Franco McGee, City Manager E. L. Faison, City Attorney S. Mujeeb Shah -Khan and City Clerk Bridgette Robinson. Absent: Council Member Billy Jordan. Visitors: Lisa Strickland, Bruce Bounds, Brian Borne, David Lucore, Pete Hovanec, Ashley Britt, Tonya Edwards and Anthony Cisero. Mayor Kilgore called the City Council Strategic Planning Meeting of July 16, 2019 to order at 4:00 p.m. A quorum was present. Item No. 1. Belk Tonawanda Master Plan Phase I -A Cost Estimate. Parks and Recreation Director Tonya Edwards stated that at the May 7, 2019 City Council Strategic Planning Meeting, Staff presented the Belk Tonawanda Master Plan for adoption. She noted that this plan would provide for the development of the property purchased in 2017 adjacent to the park and add additional amenities within the existing park. Ms. Edwards stated that Staff showed that the project seemed to be a good fit for the North Carolina Parks and Recreation Trust Fund Grant (PARTF) that could be submitted during the next grant cycle in May 2020. She stated that Council expressed interest in making some improvements to this property sooner than the proposed timeframe and requested Staff provide a cost estimate for site work, parking area, pedestrian entrance, and a new sign. Ms. Edwards stated that in working with the Alfred Benesch Company, the estimated cost for this portion of the project would be $163,553. Ms. Edwards advised that the Parks and Recreation Department did not have any funding allocated in this year's budget for this project, so if Council decided to move forward, a Budget Ordinance was needed to allocate the funds out of this year's General Fund and requested guidance from Council. Council Member Anthony asked if the City would be eligible for a PARTF grant in May 2020. City Council Strategic Planning Meeting July 16, 2019 Page 268 Ms. Edwards stated that was correct and Staff still planned to apply for that grant if Council approved, but remove the aforementioned elements from the application and then apply for the splash pad, shelter and the restroom facilities. Council Member Anthony questioned if she was talking about moving forward with the whole project. Ms. Edwards stated that what Staff identified as Phase I -A included the parking area, pedestrian path, and sign. Council Member Anthony questioned if that was all Staff was asking be approved. Ms. Edwards stated that was all that would be included in the $163,000 plus the site work and design. City Manager Faison stated that he recalled interest to get something going at the access to show momentum. Council Member Anthony stated that she just wanted to specify what was being requested. Ms. Edwards stated that Staff would go forward with applying for a PARTF grant in May 2020 for the splash pad, shelter and restrooms and matching funds would need to be allocated in the next fiscal year. Mayor Kilgore asked how long would it take to do that. Ms. Edwards stated that in discussing this with the architect, it would probably take around seven months and that was dependent on weather. Council Member Keziah moved to adopt Budget Ordinance BO -2019-13: CAPITAL PROJECT BUDGET ORDINANCE BELK TONAWANDA PARK PHASE I -A BO -2019-13 WHEREAS, the City desires to provide park and recreation facilities for City residents; and WHEREAS, the City purchased property on Charlotte Avenue to add amenities to the existing Belk Tonawanda Park; and WHEREAS, City Council wishes to begin implementation of the Belk Tonawanda Master Plan that was presented to Council on May 7. Phase 1-A includes site work, a pedestrian path, a parking area and a sign along Charlotte Avenue. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED that the City Council hereby creates a project for Belk Tonawanda Park Phase 1-A and approves funding as follows: General Fund: Revenues: City Council Strategic Planning Meeting July 16, 2019 Page 269 Appropriation from Unassigned Fund Balance $163,553 Expenditures: Transfer to General Capital Project Fund $163,553 General Capital Project Fund: Revenues: Transfer from General Fund $163,553 Expenditures: Capital Improvements $163,553 Adopted this 1611' day of July, 2019. Council Member McGee seconded the motion which passed unanimously with the following votes: AYES: Council Members Anthony, Holloway, Keziah, McGee, Mayor Pro Tem Anderson and Mayor Kilgore NAYS: None Item No. 2. Enemy Services Capital Proiect Update/Overview. Energy Services Interim Director David Lucore stated that Energy Services was composed of two divisions: Natural Gas and Electric. Mr. Lucore explained that the Electric Division Staff was working on the replacement and retirement of Downtown vault switches, North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) Utility relocations due to widening and intersection projects, Camelot Subdivision underground cable replacements, several subdivisions that were in the planning/review process or underway, Bio Gas Facility to be located in Monroe near the intersection of Highway 74 and Secrest Avenue, Goulston Technologies expansion, Supplemental Power Agreement options and alternatives and Mutual Aid Disaster Drill with ElectriCities of North Carolina. Mr. Lucore explained that all of the Downtown infrastructure was put into place in the mid 1970's and everything was underground (cables and transformers); however, it was aging and failed on several different occasions. He noted that the layout involved 8' x 12' vaults which was a concrete enclosed box in ground from 8 to 12 feet below the grade of the road and all of the wires were in concrete encased conduit throughout the Downtown area. Mr. Lucore advised that was the best technology at the time and it had served the City well; however, having all the vaults below grade in a concrete box that employees had to get in and operate were high voltage — 13,200 volt vaults and cables that carried energy through there. Mr. Lucore stated that there were a lot of risk factors to employees and also factors that involved the extensive outages because it was below the ground it took longer to repair, find the problem and outages lasted longer. Mr. Lucore explained that Staff would replace a lot of the switches that were down there with above grade switches, wrap the cables from the vaults into these pad minna switches which were City Council Strategic Planning Meeting July 16, 2019 Page 270 a lot safer for employees to work on and could work out in the open and operate with less risks to themselves than ones in the vault. He noted that two switches had been completed at Church Street and Stewart Street between City Hall and the Union County Government Center and Beasley Street and Morgan Street. Council Member Anthony asked how many switches had to be replaced. Mr. Lucore advised that there were 11 switches in the ground and all of those would come out and replaced with six switches and eliminate five of the existing switches. Council Member Keziah asked how long it took to switch one out. Mr. Lucore stated that it was done in three different outages about six to eight hours each. He noted that employees set the new switch before the first outage in order to minimize the down time for the citizens. Mr. Lucore stated that the existing vaults were prone to rust and stayed full of water from road runoff and were just in bad shape which was also a safety risk to employees. He stated that all of these switches were degraded to the point that employees were not allowed to go in there with the switches energized because any one of them could fail at any time and preferred that employees were not in there when that happened. Mr. Lucore stated that the most recent one was finished earlier this year in FYI and in FY20, Staff would be working on the Crowell Street side near the former Community Shelter facility and working up towards Hayne Street. He advised that in FY21, they would go through Stewart Street with three switch locations and in FY22, two switch locations at the south end of town near the post office. Mr. Lucore stated that once Staff was finished, Downtown would have reliable power for decades to come. Mr. Lucore stated that there were several NCDOT's utility relocations and all required the City to move electric lines in some form or fashion such as poles, wires, and even fiber optic lines. Mr. Lucore stated that Highway 74 and Rocky River Road was currently under construction to become a Superstreet aligning James Hamilton Road with Myers Road. He noted that Staff had already moved an overhead pole line and still had to move the fiber optics in that location. Mr. Lucore stated that NCDOT would be replacing the bridge at Skyway Drive and Highway 74 and Concord Avenue and Highway 74, adding roundabouts at either ends of the exit and entrance ramp and the City had lines that would have to be moved. Mr. Lucore stated that NCDOT planned to widen Highway 74 from Rocky River Road to Dickerson Boulevard. He noted that he did not know when that would happen; however, Staff was advised that City's overhead utility lines would be impacted, but to what extent, Staff was not sure yet. City Council Strategic Planning Meeting July 16, 2019 Page 271 Mr. Lucore stated that NCDOT also planned to widen and redo the intersection of Dickerson Boulevard and Charlotte Avenue and widen Highway 601 North from Highway 74 up to the Monroe Bypass and all of these would impact the City's electric utilities in some way. Mr. Lucore stated that the Camelot Subdivision located behind Chick-fil-A restaurant on Highway 74 encompassed King Arthur Drive, Knights Court, Round Table Road and Fox Moore Drive. He stated that all of these cables and transformers were installed in the early 1980's and it had degraded to the point that those facilities need replacing. Mr. Lucore reviewed the anticipated subdivision construction which included new subdivision at Rocky River Road and Secrest Shortcut with 167 townhomes; Rocky River Road and Myers Road with 50 townhomes; James Hamilton Road and Rocky River Road with 100 townhomes; Secrest Price Road with 119 townhomes; Frasier Court, Dickerson Boulevard and Charlotte Avenue with 72 apartment buildings; Secrest Commons on West Franklin Street with 425 single-family homes; Alexander Commons and ML King, Jr. Boulevard/Highway 75 with 52 single-family homes and 25 townhomes; Medlin Road with 75 single-family homes; 601 South and White Store Road will be 250 single-family homes; Concord Avenue 360 single-family homes; Deese Road with 98 single-family homes and 130 townhomes; and, Secrest Shortcut Road with 200 single-family homes. He stated that this was 2,123 new residences, 1,460 single-family homes, 591 townhomes, and 72 apartments that the City would be tasked with running electric service to all of these because of being within the City's territory. Mr. Lucore stated that the Bio Gas facility was a "poultry litter anaerobic digester" or collected poultry waste and produced electricity. He explained that it was a renewable energy source that generated 6.2 megawatts of power from poultry waste. Mr. Lucore noted that they had an agreement with the City and Duke Energy to supply this power back on the power grid to be located at Highway 74 near Secrest Avenue towards Tyson Foods. He advised that construction was planned for 2020/2021 and the City had agreed to allow Bio Gas to sell the power generated at their facility through the City's lines to get back to Duke Energy at a rate of $1.31 per generated kilowatt per month and would produce an estimated annual revenue of $98,000. Mr. Lucore stated that Goulston Technologies was in the midst of expanding their facility and requested to construct a pipe bridge under the City's existing overhead electric line. He stated that there was a main line that traversed their property along the creek side and Goulston wanted to cross that with metal pipes that would be in conflict with the energized wires so Staff provided an estimate to convert that to underground to allow this to happen. Mr. Lucore stated that it was an expense to the City of $147,222.27 and Goulston Technologies agreed to pay a contribution in aid to recoup this money back to the City which was being presented to at the City Council Regular Meeting tonight. He explained that there would be an eight-year period of payback and Goulston Technologies could pay it back in dollars or increase their electric load at the facility enough to cover that expense. Mr. Lucore advised that the Supplemental Power Agreement was created in the late 1970's/1980's, when the City joined 18 other cities in the western part of the State and formed the NC Municipal Power Agency 1 and the City bought the majority share of the Catawba Nuclear Generating Station and Duke Energy operates that for the City; however, the NC Municipal Power Agency owned the City Council Strategic Planning Meeting July 16, 2019 Page 272 majority share and one of those generators. He stated that the City received the majority of its' electricity from that station; however, there was about 2% of the City's energy needs that was not supplied from there and got it from a supplemental power supplier. Mr. Lucore noted that Staff was currently looking at options to purchase this supplemental power at a reduced rate and one option was a natural gas fire generation plant that could produce this energy from the City's natural gas pipeline. Council Member Keziah asked how long would that take. Mr. Lucore stated that probably 18 to 24 months including engineering, construction and getting it operational. Council Member Keziah questioned how much money that would generate over what the City was now. Mr. Lucore stated that around $250,000 annually. Mr. Lucore stated that he would be traveling to Raleigh tomorrow with all of the cities that were a part of ElectriCities for a disaster drill based on how the City would respond to a hurricane. He stated that there were Mutual Aid Agreements between the cities. Mr. Lucore advised that the Gas Division was in the midst of a pipeline expansion to Edwards Wood Products in Marshville, NCDOT utility relocations, Concord Avenue system upgrade, subdivision construction and several system improvement projects. He stated that the pipeline expansion to Edwards Wood Products received a $100,000 contribution from Union County to help fund that expansion into Marshville. Mr. Lucore stated that was currently in the design and permit process and planned to bid the project at the end of the month and still had 11 rights of way yet to be gained. He advised that Staff planned to start in September with an estimated completion date of March 2020. Mr. Lucore stated that the NCDOT Gas Relocation Projects were some of the same ones that affected the electric system. He noted that the Stewarts Creek Bridge on Morgan Mill Road was slated for 2026, bridge replacement on Old Camden Road 2023, Sikes Mill Road and Tom Boyd roundabout installation, but there was no estimated date on that one yet. Mr. Lucore stated that Staff had replaced aging two-inch steel gas main, putting in four -inch plastic main pipe from Charlotte Avenue to Concord Avenue with an estimated lifespan of over 50 years. He noted that all of the mainline pipe had been replaced and was in the ground now and crews were tying in all of the service lines and the mains and hoped to finish within the next two to three months. Mr. Lucore stated that the Natural Gas Subdivision construction had all of the same subdivisions that affected the Electric Division. Mr. Lucore stated that Simpson Farms on Secrest Shortcut would be 194 single-family homes, Fowler Secrest would be 67 single-family homes and 76 townhomes, Ridge Road to Stratford 207 City Council Strategic Planning Meeting July 16, 2019 Page 273 single-family homes; Stallings Family Trust/Unionville Indian Trail Road 107 single-family homes, Poplin Grove 125 single-family homes, Myers Road 13 single-family homes, John Moore Road 21 single-family homes, Rocky River Road and Highway 84 185 single-family homes, Rocky River Road and Doster Road 75 single-family homes and the possibility of 400 additional homes in another phase after the initial 75 was constructed, Waxhaw Landing on Highway 84 would have 437 single-family homes for a total of 3,558 new residences coming into Monroe — 2,891 would be single-family and 772 townhomes that the City would serve with natural gas. Mr. Lucore stated that the natural gas system improvements on Unionville -Indian Trail Road was an interconnect between the Stratford Subdivision and Poplin Grove that would allow a better pressure on the gas system in that area. He noted that as these subdivisions came in and there was more demand for natural gas, the City had to be proactive and prepare the pipes to deliver the gas before the need was actually there. Mr. Lucore stated that Poplin Road was an interconnect and provided redundancy for the customers in that area, similar to the electric side and could feed customers from different directions in case of a break or damage and the same on the gas side. Mr. Lucore stated that Secrest Short Cut would be replacing existing two-inch plastic with four - inch plastic which would improve system pressure and allow more capacity. He noted that Patton Avenue was replacing one -inch steel with four -inch plastic to improve system pressures. Mr. Lucore stated that Deese Road and Highway 601 North would improve the system pressure. He noted that an additional interconnect to Unionville at the Glendalough and Stratford subdivision would also provide redundancy and better pressures in that area. Mr. Lucore stated that there were some challenges with all of these projects and the first one was if there was adequate staffing to meet the demands of additional electric and natural gas installation and infrastructure to meet the timelines and the demands of the customers and all of the things that come with adding an additional 4,000 customers to the City's electric and gas system. Mr. Lucore advised that staffing levels were currently adequate; however, as getting into more of the construction and additional customers were added then it could become an issue that would have to be addressed in future fiscal years. Council Member McGee questioned if there were any future plans of switching over to LED lighting for the whole City. Mr. Lucore stated that Staff had not gone that step because the LED light fixtures have been in a progressive development since being first introduced. He stated that the original LED lights were about $700 per fixture or ten times the cost of the high pressure sodium lights. Mr. Lucore explained that they have continued to come down in cost and Staff was looking into if it now made sense to replace the existing with LED in the next 12 to 18 months. CMayor Kilgore questioned if the City had adequate electric and natural gas capacity. City Council Strategic Planning Meeting July 16, 2019 Page 274 C 11 Mr. Lucore advised that at the current time there was adequate electric and natural gas capacity. Council Member Anthony questioned if there was enough even with the additional 4,000 customers. Mr. Lucore stated that there was enough capacity on both the electric and the natural gas system to absorb those customers. There being no further business, Council Member Anthony moved to adjourn the City Council Strategic Planning Meeting of July 16, 2019 at 4:37 p.m. Council Member McGee seconded the motion, which passed unanimously with the following votes: AYES: Council Members Anthony, Holloway, Keziah, McGee, Mayor Pro Tem Anderson and Mayor Kilgore NAYS: None B�&jG. K 1 re ayor Attest: a.� n Btte H. Robinson, Ciby Clerk Minutes transcribed by Deputy City Clerk Sherry K. Hicks OF Mp\ City Council Strategic Planning Meeting July 16, 2019 Page 275