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11/04/2008 Strategic Planning MeetingCITY OF MONROE CITY COUNCIL STRATEGIC PLANNING MEETING 300 W. CROWELL STREET, MONROE, NC 28112 NOVEMBER 4, 2008 - 4:00 P.M. AGENDA www.monroenc.org 1. Discussion of Addition of Chapter 58: Stormwater Utility Ordinance to the Monroe City Code of Ordinances, Amendment to the City of Monroe Fees Schedule (Chapter IV, Section 6), and Call for Public Hearing to be Held November 18, 2008 at 6:30 p.m. 2. Discussion of the Land Development Plan Text Amendment A. Action -Ordinance Removing Land Development Plan from Code of Ordinances B. Action -Resolution to Adopt Land Development Plan as Policy. C. Action -Ordinance Removing Moratorium for New Single Family Residential Subdivision Approval 3. Update on General Items of Interest A. Water and Sewer B. City Manager's Goals and Objectives C. Economic Development Recognitions City Council Strategic Planning Meeting November 4, 2008 Page 36 CITY OF MONROE CITY COUNCIL STRATEGIC PLANNING MEETING NOVEMBER 4, 2008 - 4:00 P.M. MINUTES The City Council of the City of Monroe, North Carolina, met in a Strategic Planning Meeting in the City Hall Council Chambers, 300 W. Crowell Street, Monroe, North Carolina, at 4:00 p.m. on November 4, 2008 with Mayor Bobby G. Kilgore presiding. Present: Mayor Bobby G. Kilgore, Mayor Pro Tem P.E. Bazemore, Council Members John Ashcraft, Billy Jordan, Dottie Nash, City Manager F. Craig Meadows, City ' Attorney Terry Sholar, and City Clerk Bridgette H. Robinson. Absent: Council Members Lynn Keziah and Robert J. Smith. Visitors: Bruce Bounds, Doug Britt, Russ Colbath, Chris Costner, Jason deBruyn, Jim Fatland, Katlin Haiduc, Wayne Herron, Pete Hovanec, Don Mitchell, Chris Plate, Ann Rushing, Lisa Stiwinter, Lisa Thompson, and others. Mayor Kilgore called the Strategic Planning Meeting of November 4, 2008 to order at 4:00 p.m. A quorum was present. Item No. 1. Discussion of Addition of Chanter 58: Stormwater Utility Ordinance to the Monroe City Code of Ordinances, Fee Amendment to the City of Monroe Fees Schedule (Chanter IV, Section 6), and Call for Public Hearing to be Held November 18, 2008 at 6:30 p.m. Engineering Director Jim Loyd shared with Council a brief PowerPoint presentation covering the proposed Stormwater Utility Ordinance. Points discussed during the presentation included authority, purpose, jurisdiction, creation of Stormwater management accounting, billing method and responsible parties, payment provision and utility termination, adjustment and credits, Stormwater Management Advisory Committee, and appeals procedure. Mr. Loyd advised that approval of the Stormwater Utility Ordinance would require a Fees Schedule amendment to the Residential Rate (single-family detached/mobile homes) and Non- Residential rate. Staff recommended that Council call for a public hearing to be held on November 18, 2008 at 6:30 p.m. to consider the addition of a Stormwater Utility Ordinance to the City of Monroe Code of Ordinances and an amendment to the City of Monroe Fees Schedule. Council Member Jordan moved to call for a public hearing to be held on November 18, 2008 at 6:30 p.m. to consider the addition of a Stormwater Utility Ordinance to the City of Monroe Code of Ordinances and an amendment to the City of Monroe Fees Schedule. Council Member Nash seconded the motion, which passed unanimously with the following votes: City Council Strategic Planning Meeting November 4, 2008 Page 37 AYES: Council Members Ashcraft, Jordan, Nash, Mayor Pro Tem Bazemore, and Mayor Kilgore NAYS: None Item No. 2. Discussion of the Land Development Plan Text Amendment. Assistant City Manager Wayne Herron stated Council adopted a six month moratorium in January 2008 to restrict major subdivision development within the City. This moratorium was extended in July, with an expiration date of January 21, 2009. Mr. Herron advised that the Land Development Committee conducted several meetings with the development community and took a field trip to various communities. The proposed limits in the Land Development Plan text amendment have been drafted to ensure that future development does not continue to strain the City's resources beyond the abilities to properly serve the citizens. Mr. Herron advised that the Land Development Plan was currently in Chapter 157 of the Code of Ordinances. The City Attorney previously recommended that the Land Development Plan be adopted as a policy; however, it was adopted as an Ordinance. Staff recommended that Council adopt an ordinance deleting the Land Development Plan from the Code of Ordinances and also adopt a Resolution adopting the Land Development Plan. Council Member Jordan asked if there was some type of recommendation to advise when the City was in crisis. Mr. Herron stated a crisis situation was something unique and different and he had no recommendation since each department handles different issues. The Land Development Committee recommended having a priority list available and should the City be in a situation where staff may need to start prioritizing, a decision could be made based on what staff has advised Council and it would clearly be at Council's discretion. Council Member Jordan stated this sounded totally arbitrary with no rhyme or reason and depended on who was able to pitch the better proposal to a consensus of the Council. Mr. Herron stated there was some concern of that discussed at the Planning Board; however, it was just a policy and there as a guide to be used at Council's discretion. Mr. Herron stated if this was something Council felt was too open ended or not appropriate, it could certainly be deleted at their direction. Council Member Jordan stated it would not be deleted as he was making a general observation because at some point in time this was going to come back. He wanted to be on the record as stating his concern with it being open ended. Council Member Ashcraft asked was this not done with the moratorium. Mr. Herron stated it would be done on a case by case basis and this policy would provide direction. Mr. Herron noted that if the City was in a time of limited sewer capacity, why would the Council want to annex anyone when there are citizens with vacant property who have paid taxes and the City has an obligation to serve them should they bring a development in and want to be served. He stated that was the reason annexation was listed as the lowest priority. Council Member Jordan stated this is where the policy becomes objective and is a general policy of the Council to make sewer available to all of those properties that are currently annexed into City Council Strategic Planning Meeting November 4, 2008 Page 38 the City. He stated that even if it meant not accepting voluntary annexations or not seeking involuntary annexations, that is objective because you have stated that sewer resources must match what you are currently committed to and it is not arbitrary. Council Member Jordan stated that was why he had trouble understanding why trained staff just could not say that. Mr. Herron stated it could be due to so many different elements of infrastructure from roads to schools and staff only has the ability to advise Council on those elements of infrastructure they are responsible for. He stated that Council had the ability to make decisions on infrastructure that staff does not control. Mr. Herron reviewed in-depth the proposed recommendations for single family subdivision development regulations outlined in the Ordinance as well as the proposed supplemental requirements. Mr. Herron advised another recommendation was empty nester/age restricted housing may continue to be allowed and considered up to three units per acre with 100% clustering. Staff, Planning Board, and the Land Development Committee recommended that Council delete the Land Development Plan from Chapter 157 of the Code of Ordinances, adopt the entire Land Development Plan which included the new proposed amendments for single family subdivision development, and end the moratorium currently in effect should the first two choices be adopted. Council Member Jordan asked had staff calculated the costs added to the price of a house in a subdivision that a developer could do today versus tomorrow. Mr. Herron stated there was really no way to do that because it was all based on materials chosen and size of the lot; there are costs added, but how much depends on what the developers choose. Mayor Pro Tem Bazemore requested tree size explanation. Mr. Herron stated that David Grant advised that a tree over three inches in caliper was more likely not to survive replanting and was also more expensive. Mayor Pro Tem Bazemore asked if there should be a range. Mr. Herron stated the current requirement was one and one-half inches and staff recommended a minimum of three inches. Mayor Pro Tem Bazemore felt two and one-half inch caliper was appropriate. He was concerned that unless there was an irrigation system, several trees would have to be replaced. Mr. Herron agreed and felt that might be a good consideration. A. Action -Ordinance Removing Land Development Plan from Code of Ordinances. Council Member Ashcraft moved to adopt Ordinance 0-2008-44. ORDINANCE TO REMOVE TITLE XV, CHAPTER 157: LAND DEVELPOMENT PLAN OF THE CITY OF MONROE FROM THE CITY OF MONROE CODE OF ORDINANCES 0-2008-44 Pursuant to authority conferred by Chapter 160A-381 of the North Carolina General Statutes, as amended and for the purpose of promoting the health, safety, morals, or general welfare of the inhabitants of the City, BE IT ORDAINED by the City Council of the City of Monroe that Title XV, Chapter 157: Land Development Plan of the City of Monroe Code of Ordinances be deleted from the Code of Ordinances. City Council Strategic Planning Meeting November 4, 2008 Page 39 Adopted this 4"' day of November, 2008. Mayor Pro Tem Bazemore seconded the motion; which passed unanimously with the following votes: AYES: Council Members Ashcraft, Jordan, Nash, Mayor Pro Tem Bazemore and Mayor Kilgore NAYS: None B. Action -Resolution to Adopt Land Development Plan as Policy. Council Member Ashcraft moved to adopt Resolution R-2008-102. Mayor Pro Tem Bazemore seconded the motion, which passed unanimously with the following votes: AYES: Council Members Ashcraft, Jordan, Nash, Mayor Pro Tem Bazemore and Mayor Kilgore NAYS: None Said Resolution R-2008-I02 is hereby incorporated as a part of these Minutes as "Exhibit A." C. Action -Ordinance Removing Moratorium for New Single Family Residential Subdivision Approval. Council Member Ashcraft moved to adopt Ordinance 0-2008-49. ORDINANCE TO REMOVE THE MORATORHJM FOR NEW SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL SUBDIVISION APPROVAL 0-2008-49 BE IT ORDAINED BY THE MONROE CITY COUNCIL AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MONROE, NORTH CAROLINA, PROVIDING FOR THE REMOVAL OF THE MORATORIUM ON NEW SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL SUBDIVISIONS. WHEREAS, the City of Monroe on July 15, 2008 renewed the moratorium for an additional one hundred eighty (180) days for all new single-family subdivisions with the exception of minor subdivisions containing no more than two (2) lots; and WHEREAS, the City of Monroe has assessed the public facilities, resources, and infrastructure necessary for the approval of new development to ensure the protection of public health, safety, and welfare; and WHEREAS, Monroe City Council requested the Land Development Committee to study the residential growth issues and present recommendations to ensure that the City's public facilities, resources, and infrastructure are not jeopardized by uncontrolled growth; and WHEREAS, the City of Monroe has developed ordinances to ensure that future development does not continue to strain the City's resources beyond their abilities to properly serve the citizens of Monroe. NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the City Council of Monroe that the moratorium on t new single family residential subdivisions is lifted. Adopted this 4`" day of November, 2008. City Council Strategic Planning Meeting November 4, 2008 Page 40 Mayor Pro Tem Bazemore seconded the motion, which passed unanimously with the following votes: AYES: Council Members Ashcra8, Jordan, Nash, Mayor Pro Tem Bazemore and Mayor Kilgore NAYS: None Item No. 3. Update on General Items of Interest. A. Water and Sewer. City Manager Meadows advised staff had met with Union County several times to discuss water and sewer. Water Resources Director Russ Colbath noted that County Manager Al Greene advised that the water supply report currently being developed was not going to be ready until spring of 2009. Staff felt this was something major and felt that the level of information to come from that engineering report would be required in order to write a good agreement to present to Council. Mr. Colbath stated that on November 3, City Manager Meadows, City Attorney Sholar and he met with the County to talk about the agreement. Staff had prepared a draft agreement in July outlining most of the wastewater details, but lacked the water details because staff was still waiting on those. Former County Public Works Director Christie Putnam gave a presentation in May and noted the information was still forthcoming. Mr. Colbath stated staff was able to clarify a number of things related to wastewater, and they had some questions about the water engineering study. Mr. Colbath stated during discussions, the idea was presented about potentially moving forward with an agreement that included just the wastewater expansion, but that the water would be more general. The County used the term that "Monroe would be assured a seat at the table". Mr. Colbath advised he relayed to the County that his direction from Council and the City Manager was to keep those two things in the same agreement in detail. He asked if Council wanted staff to move forward in any way to negotiate a wastewater only agreement before the engineering information becomes available for the Yadkin/Pee Dee water supply in February or March 2009. Council Member Jordan stated his understanding was that Council had directed staff to wait until the spring before moving forward to enter into an agreement and felt nothing had changed. Council Member Nash agreed. Mr. Colbath advised his comments to Council in October was that he did not see a lot of risk for the City to wait until spring when the water information was available because we had wastewater capacity to offer in a down economic climate. Council Member Ashcraft stated his concern was that based on what Mr. Colbath shared with Council in the past was for Monroe to put in a four million gallon capacity facility that was going to cost about $70+ million dollars and if the City partnered with Union County and constructed a ten million gallon capacity, it would be approximately $50 million for each jurisdiction. He felt this way the City would end up with an extra million gallon capacity saving the City and County about $23 million each. Council Member Ashcraft stated that his only issue was unless the City Council Strategic Planning Meeting November 4, 2008 Page 41 County has a solid source to get water, they could not enter into an agreement to give away something they did not have. Council Member Ashcraft felt they should be negotiated separately. Council Member Jordan stated the only problem with negotiating separately was that staff has been looking for another source of water for many years and if the City was in a position and agreed to a sewer agreement and there is not a water deal forthcoming that, was the only negotiating position that the City has with the County. Council Member Ashcraft stated he was not trying to accommodate the County, but was trying to save the citizens and businesses $23 million dollars and pick up an extra million gallons of sewer capacity. Council Member Jordan stated he was aware how long the City has worked in trying to bring additional water and this was the best opportunity to do it with a partner. The County is negotiating with every one around Monroe that has the ability to help provide water. He felt like the City had a seat at the table, but there maybe negotiations going on that the City did not have privilege to. Council Member Jordan asked Mayor Kilgore to direct Council on what action he would like to see as a result of this. Mr. Colbath felt a three or four month delay would not throw the wastewater deal out. He felt the City still had a very good offer to make the County and he recommended waiting that period of time in order to get additional, good information on the water to help staff build something positive on the water side in the agreement. Mr. Colbath advised the City's other options on water are extremely limited and nobody knows what the future holds. He advised that staff fought hard to keep water and sewer together in 2005 and if they were separated and the wastewater deal was done and there was a change of feeling on the political level related to water, the City's options are very limited. Mr. Colbath asked for direction from Council regarding moving forward with separate negotiations. Mr. Colbath felt the City would not lose the wastewater deal by waiting that period of time and felt staff needed some solid information or at least the Preliminary Engineering Report from Union County on water to help inform Council about their plans, understand what this system might entail, and what the preliminary costs might be on the water side in order to build some of that into a better agreement. Mayor Pro Tem Bazemore was concerned about "a seat at the table". Mr. Colbath agreed it was not the typical type of term in a detailed agreement. When staff wrote the draft agreement on the water side, Union County would assure at least five million gallons per day in the first phase of supply and an additional five in a second phase. The City needs an additional ten million gallons per day to meet build out in 50 - 70 years. Mr. Colbath advised this agreement was designed to meet all of the City's ultimate needs and recommended waiting for the water supply Preliminary Engineering Report from the County so that a more comprehensive water and wastewater agreement can be negotiated and brought to Council for approval. City Council Strategic Planning Meeting November 4, 2008 Page 42 Mr. Colbath reviewed for Council that the City did currently have over one million gallons per day of available wastewater treatment plant capacity, and therefore the City had a lot to offer prospective development in this down economy. Given this wastewater availability, the consequences of waiting for the Water Supply Preliminary Eng%neering Report should not be of great concern. Council Member Jordan made a motion to wait for the Preliminary Engineering Report so that a more comprehensive water and wastewater agreement can be negotiated. Council Member Nash seconded the motion. The motion to wait for the Preliminary Engineering Report passed with the following votes: ~ AYES: Council Member Jordan, Nash, and Mayor Kilgore NAYS: Council Member Ashcraft and Mayor Pro ~Tem Bazemore i B. City Manager's Goals and Objectives. City Manager Meadows provided Council with a written progress update regarding his goals and objectives for 2008 - 2009. C. Economic Development Recognitions. City Manager!Meadows advised Council of a recent article that appeared in The Business Journal about the City's economic development, and recognized Economic and Aviation Director Chris Plate for a major announcement. Economic and Aviation Director Plate advised that Expansions Solutions magazine named Monroe as one of the top five communities nationwide in the area of aerospace. The other communities recognized were Bolling Green, VA, Huntsville, AL, Mesa, AZ, and Little Rock, AR. This award recognizes organizations that demonstrate exce1ptional progress and potential in the area of development. There being no further business, the City Council Strategic Planning Meeting of November 4, 2008 adjourned at 5:25 p.m. City Council Strategic Planning Meeting November 4, 2008 Page 43 RESOLUTION TO ADOPT CITY OF MONROE LAND DEVELOPMENT PLAN R-2008-102 WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Monroe had adopted regulations within its corporate limits and extraterritorial jurisdiction pursuant to Article 19, Section 160A-381 of the North Carolina General Statutes; and, WHEREAS, the current official goals, objectives, strategies and map of the Land Development Plan were updated in 2000 and adopted as Chapter 157 of the City of Monroe Code of Ordinances in 2003; and WHEREAS, the City of Monroe desires to adopt the Land Development Plan as a policy document; and WHEREAS, adoption of the Land Development Plan's goals, objectives, strategies and map as defined therein will provide for consistent, coherent policy to guide development in the City of Monroe. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the Monroe City Council pursuant to authority given in Article 19 of Chapter 160A of the North Carolina General Statutes that the Land Development Plan of the City of Monroe be as shown on the official Land Development Plan Map and in the following text: LAND DEVELOPMENT PLAN Goals, Objectives and Strategies 1. Residential Uses 2. Commercial Uses 3. Industrial Uses Speci 1. 2. 3. 4. S, 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. ~ 11. ~ f' al Planning Areas Natural Resource and Recreation Areas The Central Business District Historic District Strategic Neighborhood Areas Charlotte Highway Corridor Office/Transitional District Planned Developments Traditional Neighborhood Development (TND) Multi-Family Development Design Standards Rocky River Road Land Use Corridor Priority for Development Consideration Resolution R-2008-102 Page 1 of28 GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES 1. RESIDENTIAL USES. (A) Goal: Improve the quality of Monroe's residential neighborhoods. (B) Objectives: 1. Encourage well-planned residential subdivisions that will promote the best interests of the residents and the community as a whole; 2. Protect the integrity of established residential neighborhoods; 3. Promote home ownership; and 4. Discourage sprawl. (C) Strategies: 1. Support an aggressive minimum housing program that targets areas the city containing concentrations of deteriorated and dilapidated dwellings; 2. Ensure that rental residential property is maintained to minimum standards as outlined in the adopted Minimum Housing Standards; 3. Encourage all new major subdivisions to be connected to public utilities; 4. Require street'"connections between subdivisions and adjoining land uses, where feasible and practical; 5. Require all rezoning request for new ,residential subdivisions to be submitted as special use district process; 6. Require all institutional uses in residential areas to be designed to minimize adverse impacts on adjacent residential properties; 7. ~ Amend the Zoning Ordinance to ensure that modular units, where they are permitted, meet the conditions for a permanent structure (foundation, location, etc.); 8. Amend the Zoning Ordinance to include a traditional neighborhood development overlay district; 9. Ensure that zoning and subdivision regulations encourage a diverse mix of r^~ t ~ housing opportunities; 10. Encourage minimum design standards for new single-family residential " subdivisions as follows: a) General Design Standards and Provisions for major Residential Subdivision that are approved as a conditional district. (1) Conditional districts may not be utilized for minor subdivisions; (2} Overlay districts are available to existing residential subdivisions over 50% developed and/or developed prior to 2002 and/or more than fve (5) lots; (3} No single family subdivision shall exceed a total of 150 lots approved within a five (5) year period; Resolutio~i R-2008-102 Page 2 of 28 (4) No more than 50 lots shall be recorded within one .calendar fir--. ~ year for any approved subdivision; (5) No portion of any lot shall be located within a floodplain; ~ (6) Qpen space shall be no less than 12.5 % of the gross area of the development tract: a. Any common open space shall have a minimum of eight-thousand (8,000) square feet; b. Only SO% of the required open space may be located within a FEMA regulated floodplain; e. A minimum 8,000 square foot pocket park shall be provided within b00 linear feet of all lots within the development unless said lot is adjacent to the common open space. The pocket park at a minimum shall be landscaped with trees and shrubs, lighted, and furnished with outdoor furniture. (7) A one hundred (100) foot ;buffer which is grassed and landscaped shall be required between the main roads/streets ~ ~ and any proposed lot within the development; j (8) When a greenway is proposed and approved as part of a subdivision amenity package, sidewalk may be waived on one side of any street or road within the development where it may have been required on both sides, at the discretion of the City Council; (9) All non Planned Development projects that provide active recreation amenities shall submit an open space plan for Planning Board review; (10) Residential exterior materials, shall be brick, stone, or fiber cement. If fiber cement is used it shall be comprised to the following standards proportioned by weight: a. Crystalline Silica (Quartz) ...................... 15-50% I b. Calcium Silicate (Hydrate) ........ .............. 35-b5% c. Calcium Carbonate ................................. 1-30% d. Calcium Aluminum e. Silicate (Hydrate) ................................. 5-20% f. Cellulose ............................................. <10% t .~ g. Fillers ................... ........................ <10% (11) Each dwelling unit shall have a two {2} car garage (20' x 20'). A maximum of 30% of all garages may be front load. (12) All driveways shall be paved and with asphalt or concrete from the street to the garage and should be able to accommodate four (4) vehicles; {13) All front load and courtyard style garages shall use carriage style doors. The carriage door design must be submitted as part of the elevation package for the conditional district review; ~ (l4) Any home built on a slab foundation should have a minimum i Resolution R-2008-102 Page 3 of 28 four course brick masonry veneer skirt {of standard brick size} 1 extending up the face of the slab; { 5} Single family homes located adjacent to existing single family homes shall have exterior materials of equal or greater value; (16) The wall of the azchitectura] front of the dwelling should not run unbroken {i.e., unarticulated) for a distance greater than twenty-four linear feet. All wall offsets should be at least one (1) foot in depth; (17} All exposed chimneys should have a brick veneer; (18} Residential developments shall submit a minimum of eight floor plans, which in turn may have multiple elevations. A portfolio shall be submitted for conditional district review that shows all four (4) sides of each elevation being proposed. (19} The minimum heated floor areas for residential developments are as follows: R-40 & R-20; 1,600 squaze foot minimum and 1,800 square foot average, R-,10; 1,300 square foot minimum and 1,500 square foot average; (20) The majority of all roof areas on any house should have a minimum of 6/12 roof pitch; I ' (21) Single family homes approved through conditional district zoning will provide sodded front yards; {22) The front yard of each home shall contain at least two (2) trees, suitable for healthy growth in our climate, each with a ~`~,,, minimum caliper two and one-half (2'h) inches measured at a height of six (6) inches above the ground; ~ (23} A monument, clock tower, art or fountain shall be provided at a key focal point along the entrance drive of the development. The structure/display shall be submitted and approved as part of the conditional district review process; {24) Connectivity to adjoining properties shall be provided; (25) The entrance drive to the development shall be designed so as to have a landscaped median for the entire length of said drive. A road cross section will be required to be submitted by the developer's engineer for '~, review by the Engineering Department; ', {26) Streets within the development that intersect with the entrance drive shall be designed with intersection improvements such as stamped pavement for the pedestrian cross walks; {27) Trees within the development that are 75 inches or greater in circumference must be preserved and shall not be removed. (28) Trees within the development that are 25 inches or greater may only be removed in they are located within an approved street cross section, building pad, or driveway area. (29} Street trees shall be required to be planted at a ratio of one (1) tree every forty (40) feet on average, or as close there to as practicable. Street trees shall not be of one species, but shall Resolution R•2008-102 Page 4 of 2$ be a variety. The variety should be coordinated to provide a theme or special appearance that is unique to the subdivision; (30) All new trees planted within the development shall be a minimum of two and one-half'(2'/a) inches in caliper at time of planting. (31} Require reverse frontage access for al! subdivision lots that abut major thoroughfares, where practicable; (32) Require the use of fences, berms, walls, or landscaped materials to provide a visual and noise buffer between residential lots and adjoining thoroughfares, where practicable; (33) Require multi-family developments to be located close to major thoroughfares; (34) Require design standards for multi-family developments; (35) Encourage subdivisions to provide usable open space and/or recreation areas; {36) Prohibit the encroachment of incompatible, non-residential uses in established neighborhoods; (37) Continue to fund the city's down payment assistance program; (38) Proactively enforce the city's nuisance abatement programs; (39) Enforce the state building code. b) Residential cluster development. The purpose of cluster devel opment regulations is to provide an optional land development procedure which results in the preservation of open space; protection ~ of streams, floodplain areas and significant existing tree cover; ~.. promotion of more efficient subdivision street and infrastructure networks; and encouragement of a variety of styles or types of residential dwellings. {1) Cluster subdivisions shall be approved by a conditional district; (2) Cluster lot is defined as a residential single family lot that is less than one half acre in size in a residential single family subdivision in the R-20 or R-40 zoning districts and less than 10,000 square feet in the R-10~zoning district; (3) Clustering of residential lots is allowed, provided the number of clustered lots does not exceed more than 50% of the total number of single family lots in the development; (4) A mandatory twenty (20) foot setback and build to line shall apply to all clustered lots. AlI other developable lots shall adhere to the building setbacks found in Section 156.140 of the Unified Development Ordinance; (S) All cluster lots shall have a minimum pervious yard area of 1,800 square feet with a minimum of 1,200 square feet located in the rear yard; (6) All homes located on clustered lots shall have front porches. ~ l The length of the porch shall equal a minimum of 75% of the Resolution R-2008-102 Page 5 of 28 i n i I length of the front facade, minus the length of any front load or courtyard garage. The porch shall be a minimum of six (6) feet in depth and shall have ornamental columns and railings. Porch elevations shall be submitted as part of the conditional district process. c} The following strategies will apply to single-family homes developed on individual lots that are not included in Special Use Districts, Conditional Districts or Overlay Districts: {1) Garage or Carport. The applicant shall provide a garage or carport in accordance with the~following: The garage or carport option that exists on the majority of the dwelling units of the ten closest parcels with one single-family dwelling unit and having frontage or access on the same street shown an a Union County Tax Map as of the date the zoning application is filed with the City shall be the minimum requirement for providirig a garage or carport. If two or more options would be allowed based on two or more options having an equal majority, in such event, the lower numbered option would be the minimum required. The applicant may choose to provide a higher numbered option. If the applicant's property fronts on two or more streets, the street with the greatest amount of frontage shall be utilized. 5. Two car garage {M'uumum 400 square feet, 20' x 20'); 4. Two car carport (Minimum 400 square feet, 20' x 20'); 3. One car garage; 2. One car carport; 1. No garage or carport. {2) Exterior Walls. Any exterior building material that exists on a majority of all exterior walls of at least 30% of the dwelling units of the ten closest parcels'with one single-family dwelling unit and having frontage or access on the same street as shown on a Union County Tax Map as of the date the zoning application is filed with thee, City may be utilized on the exterior walls. If the applicant's property fronts on two or more streets, the street with the greatest amount of frontage shall be utilized. Brick may also be used in part or in whole on any dwelling unit due to its historical significance as the exterior material of choice on the majority of homes in the southeast United States; (3) Foundation. The type of foundation that exists on at least 30% of the dwelling units of the ten closest parcels with one single- Resolution R-2008-102 Page 6 of 28 i family dwelling unit and having frontage or access on the - same street as shown on a Union County Tax Map as of the date the zoning application is filed with the City shall be utilized. If the appIicant's property fronts on two or more streets, the street with the greatest amount of frontage shall be utilized. Under no circumstances shall an exposed concrete block foundation be allowed,. Any house built on a slab foundation shall have a minimum eight {8} inch brick masonry veneer skirt extending up the face of the slab; (4) Articulation. The architectural front wall shall be articulated. Atl wall offsets shall be at least one foot in depth; (5) Roof Areas. The majority of all roof areas on any house shall have a minimum 6/12 roof pitch; (6) Trees. The front yard of each lot shall contain at Ieast two trees, suitable for healthy growth in our climate. Each tree shall have a minimum caliper of two inches measured at a height of six inches above the ground. d) The following strategies will apply ~ to- Minor and Major Subdivisions, Standard: {1} Minimum heated ~ floor area' in the R-40 and R-20 Zoning Districts shall be 1,500 square;feet; {2) Minimum heated floor area in'the R-10 Zoning pistrict shall be 1,300 square feet; " (3) Exterior materials on all structures shall be brick, stone, stucco, fiber cement or a material of similar appearance; _ (4) All houses shall have a standazd two-car garage; (5) All driveways shat] be paved ,with asphalt or concrete from the street to the garage and should be able to accommodate four cars; (6) The wall of the architectural front of the dwelling shall not run unbroken (i.e., unarticulated) for a distance greater than twenty- four linear feet. Alt wall offsets shall be at least one foot in depth; ' (7) The majority of all roof areas on any house shall have a minimum 6/12 roof pitch; i (8) Street trees shall be provided; ; (9) The front yard of each lot shall contain at least two trees, suitable for healthy growth in our climate, each with a minimum caliper of one and one-half inches measured at a height of six inches above the ground; (10) Single-family homes shall provide sodded front yards; (11) Single-family homes shall provide a crawl space. 2. COMMERCIAL USES. Resolution R•2008-102 Page 7 of 28 (A) Goal: Maintain Monroe's role as the County's primary;commercial center. {B) Object ives: 1. Encourage a variety of shopping opportunities within the City; 2. Reduce the impacts of commercial development on adjacent thoroughfares; 3. Improve the appearance of commercial areas; and 4. Discourage sprawl. ' (C) Strategies 1. Support stricter regulation of business signage; 2. Require landscaping in of#=street parking areas on all new commercial i s tes; 3. Consider the use of low walls or vegetative screens around the perimeter of large off- street parking Iots as a means of reducing the visual impact of off-street parking areas; 4. Whenever possible, restrict access to major thoroughfares by requiring common driveways and frontage roads and by restricting the number of curb cuts permitted for access to single use sites; 5. Require clear delineation between parking areas and public streets; 6. Avoid further strip commercial development along existing or new highways; 7. Prohibit commercial developments that would negatively impact existing residential neighborhoods; _ 8. Make non-residential uses in "the R-O zoning distract subject to the issuance of a conditional use permit; 9. Use the R-O and B-1 zoning districts as transitional areas between established residential neighborhoods and commercial areas; ' 10. Promote neighborhood scale shopping areas; 11. Control development around the Rocky: River Road, 601N, and 200N interchanges with the Monroe Bypass; consider the feasibility of a regional commercial and residential center near the Rocky River Road interchange; 12. Support the development of a commercial node around the 601N and Monroe Bypass interchange; 13. Enforce the existing building code;. 14. Continue to lobby NCDOT to maintain its existing infrastructure; 15. Continue to lobby NCDOT far new infrastructure improvements consistent with the adopted thoroughfare plan; and 16. Amend the Zoning Ordinance to ensure ,that modular units, where they are permitted, meet the conditions for a permanent structure (foundation; • location, etc.} 3. INDUSTRIAL USES. Resolution R-2008-102 Page 8 of 28 ~ ~ {A) Goal; C i id ont n ue to prov e a good environment for a full range of industrial uses. (B) Objectives: 1. Encourage environmentally cgnscious industries to locate in Monroe; 2. Protect existing industrial corridors; 3. Encourage a diverse mix of industries; and 4. Promote managed growth. j {C) Strategies: ~, 1. Promote the area around the Monroe Regional Airport as the County's i (~' 2 primary light industrial center; . Amend the Zoning Ordinance to create a light industry district; 3. Direct potentially harmful industries away from surface waters through the conditional use permit and special use rezoning process and required buffering; 4. Promote site planning which encourages' well-planned, quality industrial development; 5. Encourage industry to locate in areas already served by adequate infrastructure; 6. Promote the Secrest Avenue Extension to and interchange with the Monroe Bypass; consider the feasibility of a commercial and industrial center near the interchange; 7. Protect the Monroe Municipal Airport by developing an airport overlay zone within the City's Zoning Ordinance; 8. Protect existing industries and the Monroe Corporate Center from the encroachment of incompatible land uses; Viand 9. identify and protect future industrial areas throughout the City. SPECIAL PLANNING AREAS ~ 4. NATURAL RESOURCE AND RECREATION AREAS.' ~! {A) Goal: Protect and enhance the City's natural and recreational resources. (B) Objectives: 1. Protect the City's drinking water supply; 2. Maintain and expand open space areas and recreational resources throughout the City; and; 3. Support floodplain protection and management. (C} Strategies: 1. Direct development away from environmentally sensitive areas; Resolution R-2008-I02 Pagc 9 of28 2. Establish minimum buffer requirements depending on the type of use for development which abuts perennial streams and other bodies of water; 3. Require the clustering of development to preserve open space and environmentally sensitive lands; 4. Develop anAdopt-A-Street program; 5. Develop anAdopt-A-Stream program; 6. Frotect the City's existing tree canopy; 7. Continue to support the Aquatic and Fitness Center and the Country Club; i 8. Limit disturbances to floodplain areas, including filling and clearing; whenever feasible; 9. Maintain a minimum fifty foot undisturbed buffer along all perennial and intermittent streams; ' 10. Examine the feasibility of reestablishing forested buffers in developed areas; 11. Provide stakeholders an opportunity i to comment on proposed environmental programs; 12, Develop post construction stormwater management standards for a!1 new developments; 13. Continue to explore innovative stormwater managementltreatment alternatives to standard wet detention; 14, Encourage engineers to design new detention/retention systems to be aesthetically pleasing; 15. Increase developer and citizen awareness of floodplain issues; 16. Require site plans for special/conditional use permits and subdivision ~ ___ plats to show the 500 year flood elevatior level; 17. Develop a recreation, greenway, and open space plan for the City; 18. Explore the feasibility of establishing a thirty acre passive and active recreational park at Lake Twitty; l9. Develop a 50-75 acre softball and soccer athletic complex; 20. Maintain strict adherence to the City's water supply watershed regulations; 21. Where practical and economically feasible, annex areas which abut Lakes Twiny, Lee and Monroe; ~ ( ' 22. Examine the feasibility of developing a ;sub-regional approach to water quality protection; 23. Require the dedication of open space and neighborhood recreation areas in future residential subdivisions and other planned developments; 24. Encourage the use of greenways as a means of connecting neighborhoods and to preserve open space; 25. Adopt a tree ordinance to ensure that, to the greatest degree feasible, older mature trees on a site are not indiscriminately removed; 26. Strengthen the City's landscaping and screening requirements; 27. Develop a stormwater master plan; and 28. Adopt and enforce loco! sedimentation, erosion control and stormwater regulations. Resolution R-2 0118-1 02 Page 10 of 28 t S. THE CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT. (A) Goal: Restore the social, economic, and cultural vibrancy of Downtown Monroe. (B) Objectives: 1. Protect the historic integrity and unique architectural characteristics of Downtown; 2. Encourage new and expanded small business and service uses in Downtown; and 3. Promote a pedestrian-friendly atmosphere; in Downtown. (C) Strategies: 1. Redevelop the site of the former Joffre Hotel with a use that is compatible with and furthers the goals of the Downtown development programs; 2. Continue to support strong design standards for Downtown development; 3. Continue to lobby NCD~T for the western loop and other identified thoroughfare improvements to reduce the volume of through truck traffic; 4. Encourage residential uses in Downtown Monroe, especially on the upper floors of buildings which otherwise would remain vacant; S. Examine the feasibility of widening existing sidewalks; _ 6. Repair existing sidewalks and extend them where necessary to provide a ' comprehensive pedestrian network; 7. Continue to maintain public spaces; 8. Develop a policy to guide the use of public sidewalks for private enterprise; 9. Resolve solid waste collection programs; ~ . 10. Improve directional signs and enhance the gateways into Downtown; and 11. Identify new opportunities to provide public parking. (D) Special Use Permits within the Central Business District shall adhere to the followingpolicies.• I. Awninr~s and Canopies. When used, awnings and canopies shall be placed at the top of window openings and should relate to the shape of the top of the window. Awnings should be made of canvas or treated canvas material. Vinyl or metal awnings are not appropriate. No awning I should extend more than two-thirds the' width of the sidewalk or nine feet, whichever is less. Awnings and canopies should rest on or interfere with the use of pedestrian walkways or streets. In no case should any i awning extend beyond the street curb or interfere with street trees or ~ public utilities; ~ ~ 2. Building Presentation. Building entrances should face the street and be Resolution R-2008-102 Page I t of 28 i accessible from the public sidewalk. Any portion of a building facing an adjacent street right-of--way shall be considered a building front and ~ should be subject to the presentation, entrance and fenestration requirements of this section, except that any building with three or more sides facing a street should only be required to designate two of these sides as building fronts and any building;located on a through lot should only be required to designate one side as a building front. In any case where a lot has frontage on Main Street,. Hayne Street, Jefferson Street, Franklin Street, Church Street, Charlotte Avenue, or Windsor Street, the side(s) of the building which face these streets should be designated as a building front and should be subject to'; the presentation, entrance and fenestration requirements of this section; ' ~y ( ) 3. Color. Additions and new construction should relate paint colors to natural material colors found on neighboring historic buildings. Contrasting colors, which accent architectural details and entrances, may be used; 4. Fenestration. New construction and remodeling of existing buildings in the municipal service district shall maintain the prevalent pattern and spacing of the windows and doorways on )}owntown buildings built prior to 1950. Windows on the street level front of buildings should constitute at least twenty percent and not more than fifty percent of the front faarade. Windows on subsequent levels should be a minimum of 15 square feet. Windows should be clear, transparent glass and should not be lower than two feet above grade. ;Double hung windows with a height-to-width ratio of Z:1 are preferred for upper stories. No such window or door should be horizontally jseparated by more than fifteen feet from the nearest other such window ar door in the same facade. Frames and sashes for windows should be of wood, vinyl, or pre-finished metal and may have stone, brick, or cast concrete lintels and sills. Window glass should always be set back from the building face rather than flush; 5. Front Build-to-Line. The fronts of all new buildings constructed in the municipal service district, should abut existing public sidewalks, where provided, except for outdoor cafe-type uses when a low wall or fence is (~`~ carried across the right-of way to continue the visual continuity of t building faces; b. Horizontal Rhythms. Downtown )juilding patterns traditionally emphasized strong horizontal design element. New construction and additions to or remodeling of existing buildings should maintain a clear visual division between street level and any upper floors. The division of floors may be accomplished by any historically significant architectural feature used to accomplish this effect; 7. Materials. Facade materials found in the Downtown district include wood, brick and stone. Additions and new construction should use facing materials that are compatible in quality, color, texture, finish, and dimension to those common in the Downtown area on buildings Resolution R-2008-102 Pagc 12 of 28 constructed prior to 1950. Acceptable materials include, but may not be limited to brick, stone or wood. Under no circumstances should metal siding, unfinished concrete block, or vinyl siding be allowed; 8. Roofs. Additions and new constructionusing aflat pitch or low pitch roof design (anything under 3:12) must install parapet walls on all sides or cap the walls with a cornice treatment that provides articulation to the roofline; 9. Walls and Entrances. Walls and entrances in the municipal service district shall be designed to encourage and compliment pedestrian-scale activity. Recessed doorways at building fronts are required. i 6. HISTORIC DISTRICT. i (A) Goal: Maintain and promote the integrity and viability of Monroe's historic neighborhoods. {B) Objectives: 1. Promote compatible development ~ within Monroe's historic neighborhoods; 2. Use the Historic District designation as a means of stabilizing older neighborhoods that may be prone to disinvestments; and 3. Promote home ownership in the City's historic neighborhoods. {C) Strategies: 1. Amend the City's Zoning Ordinance to encourage quality infill single- family residential development within established Historic District areas; 2. Alter Historic District boundaries as necessary to include neighborhoods that have special architectural or historic characteristics when petitioned; 3. Explore passible new incentives to encourage the rehabilitation and maintenance of historic properties; 4. Maintain public infrastructure; and 5. Continue the revolving loan program. f 7. STRATEGIC NEIGHBORHOOD AREAS. (A) Gaal: Improve the integrity and stability of fragiie residential neighborhoods. (B} Objectives: ~ 1. Promote home ownership; 2. Reduce crime; and j 3. Minimize nuisance and solid waste collection problems. Resolution R-2008-102 Page 13 of 28 {C) Strategies: I. Amend the City's Zoning Qrdinance where necessary to prevent or reverse the intrusion of incompatible non=residential uses; 2. Develop targeted comprehensive neighborhood improvement programs that address infrastructure, code enforcement, crime control and prevention, and solid waste collection; ~ 3. Support the neighborhood watch program; 4. Support a strong code enforcement program; 5. Maintain responsive community policing; 6. Assist with the development of neighborhood leadership; 7. Encourage programs that provide !quality affordable housing opportunities; 8. Enforce the criminal nuisance laws; and 9. Continue to financially support downpayment assistance and housing rehabilitation programs. (D) Winchester overlay District 1. All houses should have a garage or carport large enough to accommodate two cars with'minimum dimensions of 20', feet by 20 feet; 2. In addition to the garage, each home should provide at least 100 square feet of storage either attached to the house or a detached building of similar appearance consisting of the same exterior materials as the majority material used on the home; 3. All driveways should be concrete from the street to the garage and should be able to accommodate four cars; 4. All houses should be built upon a crawl space foundation; S. The wall of the architectural front of the dwelling should not run unbroken (such as, unarticulated) for a distance greater than 24 linear j feet. All wall offsets should be at least orie foot in depth; 6. The exterior walls of all dwellings (excluding rim) should have an all- brick front. 7. All exterior walls of the home should have windows; 8. The majority of all roof areas on any house should have a minimum 6/12 ~ roof pitch; 9. The front yard of each lot should contai at ]east two trees, suitable for healthy growth in our climate, each with a minim caliper of one and one- halfinches measured at a height of six inches above the ground; 10. A!1 homes should have a front porch measuring at least six feet wide by 12 feet long; I1. All homes should have a covered rear stoop that measures at least four feet by six feet; and i 12. All principal developments should obtain a special use permit. 8. CHARLOTTE HIGHWAY CORRIDOR, Resolution R-2008-102 Page 14 of 28 {A) Goal: Provide for an orderly transition of land uses !within the Charlotte Highway Corridor. (B} Objectives: 1. Protect established residential neighborhoods; 2. Protect existing business and industry; and 3. Minimize incompatibilities between land uses. i (C) Strategies: 1. Prevent the further encroachment of incompatible non-residential uses on established residential neighborhoods such as Helms Park, Pinedell, Old Town, Benton Heights, and Hasty Woods; 2. Encourage the orderly transition of ;stranded residential lots to commercial, office and light industrial uses; 3. Require adequate buffering and screening between different land uses; 4. Continue to lobby NCDOT for the funding necessary to improve Charlotte Avenue, including widening and'sidewalk construction; 5. Restrict commercial and industrial growth to those uses with minimal offsite impacts (e.g. noise, odor, light, dust, etc.); 6. Discourage new residential subdivisions within the corridor; and 7. Restrict driveway access, where possible, to maintain levels of service along Charlotte Highway. 9. OFFICE/TRANSITIONAL DISTRICT. (A) Objectives: I 1. Provide adequate land areas for growth of the medical community; and 2. Minimize the potential for incompatible asses within and adjacent to the medical facility district. {B) Strategies: 1. Review the City's land use regulations to ensure that they support the orderly growth and development of the medical community; 2. Encourage the expansion of the medical facilities district in areas that would not negatively impact existing residential neighborhoods; 3. Encourage the development of planned ;medical office complexes and subdivisions; 4. Maintain zoning regulations that allow a mix of compatible and symbiotic uses within the medical facility; district; 5. Work with Union Regional Medical Center to develop an attractive City gateway along US 74 and Franklin Street; and 6. Consider the adoption of design standards for non-residential uses within the district. Resolution R-2008-102 ?age l 5 of 28 10. PLANNED D EVELQPMENTS. ~ i {A) Strategies: j 1. A Planned Development will consist of all non-residential development over 50,000 square feet of building floor area, excluding industrial; 2. Strategies will apply to mixed developments which may include a mix of the following: business, multi-family, single-family and office development; . 3. A fifty-foot buffer will be provided adjacent to residential zoning; 4. A traffic impact study may be required; 5. Exterior materials must be brick, stone, stucco, fiber cement or material ~ of similar appearance; , 6. Single-family uses will be allowed at 4 units per acre; 7. Multi-family uses allowed at 20 units per acre; 8. Twenty percent of a project shall be dedicated to open space, except within a watershed district and single use non-residential development. Within a watershed district amenities shall be proposed as is practical and in proportion to the uses that are provided that may utilize such facilities; ~, 9. Twenty percent minimum land area rri;ust be assigned for each use /~ I0. proposed; A coordinated sign plan must be provided and reviewed by Planning t , Board. j 11. A coordinated open space plan must be submitted showing all proposed amenities and elements and must be reviewed by the Planning Board; 12. A landscape plan must be submitted and reviewed by the Community Appearance Commission; i 13. Uniform appearance or theme of all structures; 14. Must be located on a major highway or arterial street or road; 15. Along the street or road frontage of any non-single family portion, at least 60% of that frontage must have a building or green area for a distance of no less than 50 feet, extending from the required eight foot street yard area; 16. Driveways shalt be limited to the number deemed safe for ingress and egress of the traveling public. Outparcels shall not have separate driveways, but shall be planned for safe access to internal planned development streets; and 17. Buildings fronting the street yard shall have windows and have aesthetically pleasing appearance. 11. TRADITIONAL NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT (TND). Resolution R-2008-102 Page 16 of 28 (A) Purposes: ~ The TND is intended to allow for the development of fully integrated mixed-use pedestrian oriented neighborhoods. The intent is to minimize traffic congestion, suburban sprawl, infrastructure costs, and environmental degradation. Its provisions adapt urban conventions, which we're normal in the United States from colonial times until the 1940's and historically were based on the following design principles: 1. All neighborhoods have identifiable centers and edges; 2. Edge lots are readily accessible to retail and recreation by non-vehicular means (a distance not great than'/4 mile) 3. Uses and housing types are mixed and in close proximity to one another; 4. Street networks are interconnected and blocks are small; and 5. Civic buildings are given prominent sites ithroughout the neighborhood. Other architectural themes may be utilized upon approval of the City Council. {B} General Requirements: 1. Permitted only in Conditional District; 2. Minimum Development Size: 15 acres; 3. Maximum Size: 200 acres (tracts larger than 200 acres shall be developed as multiple Traditional Neighborhood Developments, each individually subject to all such provisions); 4. Maximum permitted densities and total number of dwelling units shall be established during the site-plan review process. All TND developments shall follow the preliminary and final platy procedures listed in the City of Monroe Subdivision Ordinance. (C} General Design Standards acrd Provisions: 1. Use: a) The entire land area of the TND shall be divided b) c) streets, and lots and optional natural or greenbelt areas; into blocks, Similar land categories shall generally abut across streets. Dissimilar categories shall abut at rear lot lines. Corner lots which front on streets or dissimilar use shall be set back the same as the adjacent use with the lesser setback; Large-scale, single use {conference spaces, theaters, athletic facilities, etc.} shall occur behind ;or above habitable street front space; d) Prohibited Uses: Any commercial use which encourages patrons to remain in their automobiles while receiving goods or services, except service stations; chemical manufacturing, storage or distribution as a primary use; enameling, painting or plating, except artist's studios; outdoor advertising, or billboard as a principle use; carting, moving, or hauling terminal or yard; prisons, detention centers, or half-way houses; manufacturing, storage, or disposal of Resolution R-2008-I02 Page 17 of 28 hazardous waste materials; scrap yards; mobile homes; kennels; sand, gravel, or other mineral extraction; and any use which produces the following adverse impacts; noise at a level greater than typical street or traffic noise, offensive vibration, emission of noxious solids, liquids, or gases; e) Accessory structures may be used i for rental housing on attached and detached home lots; f) All uses shall be conducted within complete enclosed buildings unless otherwise specified. ~ 2. Lots and Buildings: a} All lots shall share a frontage line with a street or square; b) All buildings, except accessory structures, shall have their main entrance opening onto a street or square. 3. Stre ets and Alleys: a) Streets shall provide access to all tracts and lots. b) All streets and alleys shall terminate at other streets within the neighborhood and connect to exist and projected through streets outside the development. c) There shall generally be a•continuous network of alleys to the rear of lots within the TND. d) The average perimeter of all blocks within the TND shall not exceed 1,350 feet. No black face shall have a length greater than 500 feet without a dedicated alley or pathway providing through access. e) Utilities shall run along alleys wherever possible. f} Street lamps shall be installed on jboth sides of the street no less than 100 feet apart. g) Rights-of way and streets are encouraged to differ in dimension and each street shall be sepazately detailed. h) Steady and even build-to lines shalt be established along all streets and public space frontages, determining the width desired for each street or public space. A minimum percentage build-out at the build-to line shall be established along all streets and public square frontages. ~~ i) The long axis of the street shall have appropriate termination with either a public monument, specifically designed building facade, or a gateway to the ensuing space. 4. Parking: a) Parking lots shall generally be located at the rear or at the side of buildings and shall be screened from the sidewalk by low walls, fences or hedges; b) Parking lots and parking garages shall not abut street intersections or civic buildings, be adjacent to squares or parks, or occupy lots, which terminate a vista; c) Primary street frontages shall have no vehicular entries, for properties with another street frontage. Properties with a single- Resolution R-2008-102 Page 18 of28 (D) (E) i frontage on a primary street shall be limited to a maximum of two single lane-width vehicular entries separated by a minimum of twenty feet; d) Adjacent parking lots shall have vehicular connections via an alley or internally. I Public Design Standards and Provisions: 1. Use: a) Land designated for public use shall consist of the following: parks, squares, greenbelts, streets acid alleys; b) Public use tracts may contain civic use lots; c} Large scale recreational uses such as golf courses and multiple game f elds shall be located on the perimeter of neighborhoods (i.e., within a greenbelt); d) A minimum of 5% of the gross area of the neighborhood, or two acres, whichever is greater, shalli be permanently allocated to squares or parks; i e) Each neighborhood' shall contain as its central focus, at least one square or park no smaller than 1 acre and no greater than 3 acres. This square shall be within 600 feet of the geographic center of the neighborhood; f) Neighborhoods along waterfronts shall provide park and square requirements along the waterfront; g) Squares, parks, and other natural amenities shall have at least 75% of their perimeter abutting street rights-of--way. Golf courses shall have at least 30% of their perimeter abutting street rights-of--way; h) The remaining public use area shall be divided at least into thirds and distributed such that no portion; of the TND is further than 600 feet from a park or square. ~ 2. Lots and Buildings: a} Balconies shall be permitted to encroach up to 8 feet into a public use tract; b) All lots share a frontage line with a street or square. All buildings shall have their main entrance opening to a street or square (except accessory structures); c) Similar building massing and use i at ground level shall front a street, park, oz square. 3. Streets and Alleys: Alleys shall not form the boundary of a park, square, or greenbelt unless a wall a minimum of 6 feet in height is used for separation. 4. Parking: The developer shall demonstrate the provision of adequate parking for public use tracts containing squares and 'parks. Shared parking shall be encouraged. Civic Design Standards and Provisions. Resolution R-2008-102 Page 19 of 28 I ~` 1. Use: , a) Land designated for civic use shall ';contain but not be limited to the following: community buildings iricluding meeting halls, libraries, post offices, schools, child care centers, clubhouses, religious buildings, recreational facilities; museums, performing art buildings, and municipal buildings; b) A minimum of 2% of the gross area of the neighborhood shall be designated for civic use lots; e) Civic lots shall be within or adjacent to a square or park or on a lot terminating a street vista. 2. Lots and Buildings: Civic use buildings shall not be subject to setback limitations 3. Streets and Alleys: The long axis of the street shall have appropriate termination with either a public monument, specifically designed building facade, or a gateway to the ensuing space. 4. Parking: a) The developer shall demonstrate the provision of adequate parking for the various types of civic uses. Shared parking shall be encouraged; b) Civic use lots within public use tract may count on-street parking fronting the public use tract toward ;its parking requirements; c) Off-street parking for civic uses shall occur at the rear or side of the building. {F) Shop Front Design Standards and Provisions. 1. Use: a} Land designated as shop front use shall contain residential and commercial uses; b} At least 50% of the building area shall be designated for residential use; I c} Residential uses are not permitted on the ground floors of shop front buildings; d) A minimum of 2% and a maximum of 30% of the gross area of a neighborhood shall be designated for shop fronts. 2. Lots and Buildings: a) Buildings on shop front lots shall Have the facade built directly on the build-to line along at least 7U% of its length. The unbuilt portion of the build-to line shall have a street wall directly upon it; b) Buildings on shop front lots shall have no setback from at least one side lot line; c) Buildings on shop front lots shall cover no more than 50% of the lot area; d) The maximum height shall be 35 feet; e} The minimum height shall be 26 feet. 3. Stree ts and Alleys: j I Resolution R-2008-102 ~ Page 20 of 28 i 1, a) Shop fronts shall have their rear lot dines coinciding with an alley at least 24 feet containing a vehicula pavement width of at least 10 feet; b) Shop front lots shall enfront on streets with a maximum right-of- way of 65 feet consisting of at least, two 12 foot travel lanes, 8 foot parallel parking on both sides, and ~l2 foot sidewalks. Curb radius shall not exceed 10 feet. 4. Parking: a) No less than 75% of the parking places shall be to the rear of the building. Access may be through the frontage only if the alley entrance providing access is not within 200 feet of the lot; b) For shop fronts and workplaces, on-street parking directly enfronting a lot shall count toward fulfilling the parking requirement. (G) Attached (MF) Home Design Standards. 1. Use: a) Land designated for attached home use shall contain buildings for residential use and limited cornrnerc ial use, such as a coffee house, home occupation, or bed and breakfast; b) An accessory building is permitted on each lot; c) One-hundred percent of the building area above the ground floor shall be residential; d) A minimum of 15% and a maximum of 30% of the gross area of the neighborhood shall be designated for attached houses {muIti- family) and small lot (50 feet or less in width) detached houses. 2 Lots and Buildings: a) Buildings on ati:ached home lots shall be setback between 0 and 15 feet from the frontage line, and frontage lines (except for corner lots) shall be constant for a street. 'Buildings at street intersections shall be setback 0 feet from both frontage lines; b) Buildings on attached home lots shall have no required setbacks from side lot lines; c) Buildings on attached home lots sh all cover no more than 50% of ' the lot area; d} e} Building height shall nat exceed 35 feet; Buildings on attached home lots shall have a masonry wall, wood fence, or hedge between 3 and 5 feet tall built along the unbuilt portion of the frontage line. 3. Streets and Alleys: I. a) Attached homes and small-lot detached homes shall have their rear lot lines coinciding with an alley 24 feet wide containing a vehicular width of at least 10 feet; ', b) Attached house lots shall enfront on streets with a maximum right- of-way of 50 feet consisting of at least two 10 foot travel lanes, 8 foot parallel parking on both sides, and 6 foot sidewalks. Curb Resolution R-2008- t 02 Page 21 of 28 radius shall not exceed 10 feet. ~ ~ 4. Parking: All off-street parking places shall be to the rear of the building. Access shall be by an alley only. (H} Detached Home Design Standards and Provisios. 1. Use: a) Land designated for detached home use shall contain buildings for residential uses, customary home occupational uses, and be and breakfast inns; b) An accessory building is permitted on each lot; c) One-hundred percent of the building area above the ground floor shall be residential; d) A maximum of 30% of the gross area of the neighborhood shall be . designated for large-lot (SO feet or more in width) detached homes. 2. Lots and Buildings: I a) Buildings on detached home lots shall be setback between 10 and 25 feet from the frontage line; b} Buildings on detached home lots shalt be setback from the side lot lines equivalent to no less than 20% of the width of the lot. The entire setback may be allocated to ne side; I c) Buildings on detached home lots shall be setback no less than 30 feet from the rear lot line; d) Buildings on detached home lots shall cover no more than 50% of the lot area; e) Building height shall not exceed 35 feet; f) Buildings on detached home lots shall have a masonry wall, wood fence, or hedge between 3 and 5 feet tall built along the unbuilt portion of the frontage line. 3. Streets and Alleys: ~ a) Detached home lots may have their rear lot lines coinciding with an alley 24 feet wide containing a vehicular pavement width of at least 10 feet; b) Attached house lots shall enfront on streets with a rnaximum right- of-way of 40 feet consisting of at least two 10-foot travel lanes and 5 foot wide sidewalks. Curb radius shall not exceed 25 feet. 4. Parking: , ~ All off-street parking places shall be to the side of the rear of the building. Where access is through the fron#age, garages or carports shall be located a minimum of 20 feet behind the front facade. . ~ (I) Business Design Standards and Provisions. f ~ 1. Use: ~ a} Land designated for business use shall contain office, retail, and gas ~ 5tatiAnS; ' ~ b) A minimum of 5% and a maximum of 15% of the gross area of the i Resolution R-2008-102 ' Pege 22 of Z8 neighborhood shall be designated for business; c) Business uses shall be grouped together as follows: Office and retail may be grouped with shop front buildings to form town centers. All other business uses s}iall be grouped together outside town and neighborhood centers. ~ 2. Lots and Buildings: a) Business buildings shall not require setbacks from front or side lot lines; b} Business buildings shall not cover more than 50% of the lot area; c) Business lots shall be separated from other use types at the side and rear tot lines by a continuous masonry wall no less than 8 feet in ~, height; ' d} The maximum height shall be 35 feet. 3. Streets and Alleys: • a) Business lots may have their rear lot lines coinciding with an alley at least 24 feet wide containing a vehicular pavement width of at least 10 feet; ~ j b) Shop front lots shall enfront• on streets with a maximum right-of- way of 65 feet consisting of at least~two 11 foot travel lanes, one 10 foot central turning lane, 8 foot p iallel parking on both sides, and 9 foot sidewalks. Curb radius shall knot exceed 15 feet. 4. Parking: Off-street parking places must be to one side or to the rear of the building. (J) Architectural Standards. Due to the mixed-use nature of the development, architectural compatibility is • necessary to visually integrate development and allow for proximity of varied uses. 1. Materials: a) All walls visible from public streets shall be clad in brick, cast concrete, stone, stucco, or material similar in appearance or texture; b) Screening walls shall be made of materials which match the principle structure (if a structure consists of more than one material, the heavier material shall be used). 2. Configurations: a) Two wall materials may be combined (horizontally) on one facade. The heavier material must be below; b) Maximum screening wall height shall be eight (8) feet. Barbed • wire shall be allowed only in areas that are not visible from streets and public parking areas. 3. Techniques: a) Stucco shall be float finish; b) All rooftop equipment shall be enclosed in the building material '~ that matches the structure or is ~ visually compatible with the structure. I Resolution R-2008-t02 Page 23 of 28 , 12. MULTI-FAMILY DEVELOPMENTS DESIGN STANDARDS. (A) Public Areas, Curb Cuts and Service Areas. The following regulations apply to the public areas, curb cuts and service areas in all multi-family developments: 1. Public plazas and outdoor dining areas are encouraged. Such areas shall be protected from vehicular traffic by location, vegetation, or landscape walls and shall be easily accessible to pedestrians; 2, All dumpsters and other building service areas shall be located where they are concealed from view from ithe public right-of--way. All dumpsters shall be concealed with secured gates, landscaping, and solid screening; I 3. Curb cuts along public streets shall be minimized and shall be shared with adjacent developments where possible. Curb cut shall be permitted only where twenty-five {25) feet away from a curb cut on an adjoining ~ property, and shall not be permitted within twenty-five (25) feet of the ' intersection of any two (2) public streets. Curb cuts shall not exceed a width of twenty-four (24} feet. I (B} Architectural Regulations. The following architectural regulations shall apply to all multi-family housing: I. Exterior Materials. The exterior portions of any building shall comply with the following requirements: a) Siding material shall consist of 'brick {which is the preferred material), stone, or stucco. Lap siding made of wood, fiber cement, I or other cementous material can be~ used in areas for eaves, gables, fascias, and roof overhangs. Vertical siding, external insulating finishing system ("EYES"), metal siding, metal trim, vinyl siding and block are prohibited: b} Siding material shall be consistent hand uniform. Siding shall be a minimum of 75% brick, stone or stucco; c) The roof shall be constructed of asphalt shingles or a material that resembles asphalt shingles {i.e., i metal roofing; roofing that resembles shake shingles). Slate roofs are permissible. Roofs shall be black, a shade of gray, or earth tones. Built-up roofs are prohibited. I 2. Roofs. The roof of any building shall comply with the following requirements: I a) The main roof of the buildings shall be gabled roofs, hipped roofs, ,' mansard roofs, or combinations thereof. Flat roofs are prohibited; b) Roof overhangs of not less than eiight (8) inches and not greater I than twenty-four (24) inches shall be provided; c) Eave lines shall be consistent, largely unbroken, and horizontal. All eaves ,shall be architecturally detailed with one or more of the i Resolution R-2008-102 Page 24 of 28 I following elements: detail molding, crown molding, built-up fascia, or frieze board; d) Roofs shall contain at least one (1~) roof projection for every one hundred {100} linear feet of building frontage. Roof projections may include cupolas, dormers, balustrade walks, chimneys, or gables. 3. Massing. The massing of all buildings shall comply with the following requirements: a) Any building that is longer than ne hundred (100) feet shall be designed so as to appear as multiple structures through the use of varied roof forms, building prajecti~ns, or architectural details; b) The apparent exterior floor-to-floor height of each story of a ' building shall be limited to twelve (12) feet. Individual floors shall be delineated on the building facade through the use of window placement and horizontal details. ' Interior floor-to-floor heights may exceed twelve (12) feet; c) No primary eave line shall be greater than thirty-five (35) feet ', above great; d) Buildings shall have at least one {1) building projection on the front fagade below the eave Iine. Building projections consist of stoops, bay windows, covered porches, extruded entrances, and pedestrian arcades. With exception of pedestrian arcades, building projections shall not extend more than six (6) feet from the face of the building; /~ e) Buildings that are no longer than one hundred (100) feet shall f provide no less than ten (10) lineal feet of pedestrian arcade or covered parch. Porches and arcade columns shall not be less than six {6} feet wide in any direction ~ Metal columns are prohibited. Columns shall contain a base and a'capital and shall generally align with story heights; f) The rear side of the building cannot face a public feet. 4. Fen estration. The fenestration of all buildings shall comply with the ', following requirements: j ', a) Windowed doors shall contain a solid border a minimum of six (b) inches wide and shall also contain mullions or divided lights not exceeding six (b) inches in any direction. Flat doors are prohibited; b) All windows shall be vertically proportioned with a height to width ratio between 3:2 and 5:2. Transom windows are not subject to vertical proportions and do not county in the overall window ~~ proportions; j 'I c} Windows shall be provided on at least ten {10) percent but no more than fifty (50) percent of the front facade. Blank facades are prohibited. Windows shall generally be spaced in an even rhythm. Windowless sections of the front fa~ade shall not exceed thirty (30) feet in width; d) All windows shall be rectilinear, provided, however, that arch top windows are permitted. Triangular pr otherwise angular windows Resolution R-2008-102 Page 25 of 28 are prohibited. Round windows are permitted as accent windows in locations such as gables; e) Primary windows shall be at least twenty-four {24) inches wide and at least thirty-six (36) inches tall.; Picture windows shall be no wider than five (5) feet and no taller than seven and a half {7 ''/z} feet; f) Shutters shall be constructed of woad, vinyl, or a material with wood-like properties, shall be sized to fit the window, and shall have horizontal slats, vertical boards, or raised-paneled. Shutter colors shall be equal to or similar to earth tone colors; g) On brick walls all windows shall have sill and header trim details. On non-brick walls all windows shall have sill or header trim details; h} The bottom of windows shall be at least twenty (20) inches above grade. 5. Sidewalk and Pedestrian Crosswalks. The following sidewalks and pedestrian crosswalks and regulations shall apply to all multi-family housing: ~ a) Public sidewalks shall be located adjacent to all public streets and shall be a minimum of five {5} feet wide; b) Pedestrian walkways shall be located on private property and shall be located at all building entrances. All buildings shat! provide a ten {10) foot minimum pedestrian ozone between the building and parking area. The pedestrian zone shall contain walkways, planting areas, plazas, and similar landscaped spaces. All pedestrian walkways shall be a minimum of five (5) feet wide; e) All public sidewalks and pedestrian walkways shall be continuous where possible and shall connect to other pedestrian areas through painted crosswalks; d) All major intersections shall have well-defined pedestrian crossing signs; ~ e) All utilities shall be placed under ground; f) The front entrance of all buildings shall be easily and safely accessible to pedestrians from the public sidewalk through a combination of pedestrian walkways and crosswalks; g) Covered sidewalks that are part of the building and that are located within the buildable area of the lot;are encouraged where possible. Such covered sidewalks may be used for outdoor seating and dining and as terraces and arcades. 13. ROCKY RIVER ROAD LAND USE CORRIDOR. ' {A) Goals: 1. To provide compatible land uses within t!he Rocky River Road Land Use Corridor that meet the needs of the community; I Resolution R-2008-I02 Page 26 of 28 t 2. To provide residential neighborhoods surrounding major boulevards yr thoroughfares a short and convenient access to a commercial node. (B} Purposes: 1. Define high traffic volume generating commercial uses around the proposed Monroe bypass interchange and major highways that will meet the needs of the traveling public; j 2. Designate medium traffic volume generating commercial uses and attached residential land uses around boulevards and thoroughfares to draw customers from adjoining neighborhoods; 3. Define transition land uses to serve a ~ a buffer from commercial to residential uses; 4. Promote parks and greenways to be developed in floodplain areas. (C) Objective: To provide guidance when determining whether or not a future development proposal is consistent with the goals and objectives for the Rocky River Road Land Use Corridor. (D) Strategies: 1. Divide the Rocky River Road Land Use Corridor into three nodes: a) Regional-Retail Node; b) Neighborhood-Retail Node; e) Neighborhood-Retail Node; 2. Locate the Regional and Neighborhood- ' etail Nodes at the intersections of interchanges, major boulevards and thoroughfares, where they can be commercially viable. 3. Designate the size of the node boundarie i in order to provide a 10 minute walk or 5 minute drive access from su 4rounding neighborhoods to the nodes commercial core. 4. Require adequate screening and buffering between different land uses as well as along intermittent and perennial streams. 5. Encourage the development of parks, pl as, greenways and open space in floodplain areas. (E) Rocky River Road Land Use Corridor Requirements: 1. Regional-Retail Node. The Regional-Retail Node is intended to concentrate high traffic volume generating commercial uses such as shopping malls, hotels, restaurants, and entertainment geared toward the traveling public as well as attracting consumers from a 20 to 30 mile radius and shall be located at the core of this node. A mix of professional offices, retail uses and attached residential will serve to buffer the more intense commercial uses, while detached residential uses will be Iocated at the outer edges. Heavy commercial uses which do not sell products or provide services to everyday use are not encouraged in this classification; 2. Neighborhood-Retail Node. The Neighborhood-Retail Node is intended to concentrate medium traffic volume generating commercial uses and Resolution R•2008-I02 Page 27 of 28 1 i I and designed to draw customers from adjoining neighborhoods. This node should be predominately focused on retail and professional offices located at the core of this node. Attached and detached residential and public facilities will serve to buffer the more intense commercial uses in the core of the node; 3. Transitional Node. The Transitional Node includes the area not within the Regional or Neighborhood-Retail Nodes. This node is intended to concentrate low volume generating uses (such as offices, public facilities and all types of residential uses; 4. The three nodes listed in 1 to 3 described the desired land uses within the Rocky River Road Land Use Corridor study. Any and all zoning changes or development approvals requiring a zoning change shall be considered during a Conditional District Rezoning process; 5. All proposed Conditional District Rezoning requests shall comply with all set forth regulations in Chapter 156 sand 157 of the City of Monroe Code of Ordinances. I 14. PRIORITY FOR DEVELOPMENT~CONSIDERATION The priority list noted below is for general application hand consideration in comparing whether or not to serve and/or annex developments in times when limited infrastructure capacity exists. Limited infrastructure capacity will not be defined, but wil! be established based on the collective consensus of the City Council with regard to any one or multiple elements of infrastructure deemed to be inadequate; 1. Industrial inside City limits, permitted use; 2. Commercial/office inside City limits, permitted use; 3. Industrial city limits, conditional district required; 4. Commercial/office inside City limits, conditional district required; 5. Residential inside City limits, permitted use; 6. Residential inside City limits, conditional district required; 7. Industrial annexation; $. Commercial office annexation; 4. Residential annexation. Adopted this 4`" day of November, 2008. Attest: H. ~Rohinsori, City Clerk bl ayor Resolution R-2008-102 Page 28 of 28